Education: Is It Worth It?

Education is more than just learning facts. It is learning a new way to live by increasing our understanding and enabling the powers of heaven to act in our lives.

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Have you ever wondered if going to college is worth the money, the time, and the effort? According to Forbes, the average student in 2016 had $37,172 in student loan debt. If college takes at least four years to graduate and drains you of all your time and money, what value can secondary education really bring to your life?

Well, President Henry B. Eyring has an answer for you. In his talk “Education for Real Life,” he explains that “the Lord and His Church have always encouraged education to increase our ability to serve Him and our Heavenly Father’s children. . . . Secular knowledge has for us eternal significance.” President Eyring also stresses the importance of a spiritual education in addition to secular knowledge: spiritual learning “gives our secular learning purpose and motivates us to work harder at it.”

Clearly, education isn’t just about money; it’s a matter of personal progression. It’s about freeing our minds from the bonds of ignorance and becoming free to think, feel, and act in a higher way. Can you imagine what the world would be like if all of God’s children focused on improving themselves every day? Ultimately, that’s what Heavenly Father wants for each of us: to be able to progress daily so that eventually we can become more like him.

Read “Education for Real Life” by President Henry B. Eyring.

Source: ChurchofJesusChrist.org

—Robbyn Merrell, Mormon Insights

FEATURE IMAGE BY PIXABAY

Find more insights

Read the official LDS church doctrine on education.

Also discover ways that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints supports and encourages education.

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